after the harvest: cellar work

Well, keeping your fingers crossed didn’t really help – as we didn’t have any rain since my last post, all our co-habitants around our vineyard doubled up in love for our grapes and braved the fences – badgers and wild boars were joined by roe deer, who couldn’t find any fresh grass – and they all enjoyed our juicy, sweet grapes…

No new photos of the massacre, just so much: we will have not enough grapes, to elaborate our three distinct wines in 2009 – there will be a “passe tout grain” – a mixture of Cabernet Sauvignon and Franc, Petit Verdot and Mourvedre – but I doubt, that it will “be an uncomplicated, fruity wine intended to be consumed young” as they tell about the Burgundy passetoutgrain AOC in the wikipedia article…

grape juice 2009

You can see the already intensive color and the potential alcoholic degree on our “mustimetre” or must weight. Ours is the classical French model “Dujardin” – I think, in English, it’s called a saccharometer – not yet the modern refractometer – and it showed potential 15 for the juice before fermentation started in our smallest stainless steel vat.

In the meantime, fermentation started and I enjoy taking a glass each day, before I crush the “chapeau de marc” – the cap, that is build by grape skins and stems (we don’t destemme our grapes) on top of the juice by stumping it down into the liquid with a heavy piece of wood. This helps to extract more color and tannins and keep the fermentation with our natural yeasts going…

not yet wine...

not yet wine...

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One thought on “after the harvest: cellar work

  1. Pingback: every day a little bit more « diary of a german winemaker from the South of France

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